National Prisoner Resource List (NPRL)

This list provides information about places where prisoners and their families can find:

  •  Support
  • Advocacy
  • Health care information (including HIV protection)
  • Outlets for their creativity.
  • Lifelines to the outside community.

We often hear from people that a resource on the  National Prisoner Resource List (NPRL) helped them get the services they needed or simply made them feel less hopeless because they found someplace to turn for support.

The NPRL is sent to prisoners upon request.  There is no charge for it.  It is also available below in a regular and large-print version for families and friends to print and mail to their loved ones.

Resource Lists from other groups

Frequently Asked Questions: Our Services for People in Prison

People in prison can write us a letter (via postal mail) and ask for books. The letter should include their name, address, and inmate ID number. It is best to request genres of books rather than specific titles. We also have a book request form that can be used by people inside or their family and friends.

No. We do not have the capacity to do so. It is prohibitively expensive to send large quantities of books through the mail. If you are a prison official looking for books for your library or program, please see our tips for finding books in your community.

We serve all states except Texas, California, Michigan, Nevada, Maryland and Illinois. 

Michigan and Maryland do not allow us to mail books to state prisons. Illinois is served exclusively by the amazing Urbana-Champaign Books to Prisoners program so we opted not to serve that state. Nevada requires books to be mailed first class which is not in our budget. Texas and California combined hold 1/5 of the US prison population. We do not have the capacity to serve that many additional people. Other books-to-prisoners groups serve the states we do not serve. See our list of other “Books to Prisoners” programs to find one. 

Because we have never advertised our services, we can only guess. We are occasionally listed on prisoner resource lists circulated by other organizations. People often say they heard about us from other prisoners or contacts on the outside.

All kinds of books. We find that with a few exceptions, the reading interests of folks in prison mimic those of the general public. Dictionaries are our most popular request – by far. We send out more than 2000 per year. Other popular titles include thesauruses, small business startup, exercise, drawing, exercise, fiction of all kinds, religion and much more.

People in prison use them for various reasons – writing letters to family, writing legal appeals, or just trying to understand unfamiliar words in the other books we send. Many people enter prison with limited reading skills and use their time to change that. Frustrated by his inability to express himself, Malcolm X famously taught himself to read and write in prison by copying every word in the dictionary.

Our selection of books depends on what people donate. Topics available vary widely. We also buy dictionaries and GED study guides.

In addition to books, we have a self-published legal reference, a resource guide that lists other organizations that help prisoners, and a few other booklets that cover topics that prisoners frequently request.

Most books are donated by individuals just like you. Occasionally, publishers and authors donate extra copies of their books. We also buy dictionaries, thesauruses, and GED study guides in bulk. Many generous people donate new books through our online wish lists too.