Tag Archives: Gratitude

Essay – The dictionary: a significant asset in prison

The Prison Book Program is so overwhelmingly important to prisoners in the correctional facilities because it helps us prisoners build our mental perspective on life. I mean lets face it, a lot of inmates have a “cowboys and Indians” approach or outlook on life. When an inmate reads a book or anybody for that matter, their immediate actions and decisions are largely determined by the ideas and points given in the book. When a person reads a book not only is their actions influenced but their emotions are influenced as well.

Essay – 600,000 words

Dear PBP Friends,

Let me start off by saying thank you for all of the reading material you send those of us who are imprisoned.Books have become important to me because it is a form of escape. Most prisoners did very little reading when they were free, and those of us who did, continue to read in prison. We spread the word about how books are so much better than TV because there are no TV ads to interrupt you.

Essay – Prisoners educate themselves with books

In the information age of today, we can literally feel the pulse of world events as they happen. Fifty years ago one could hardly conceive the advances in technology and communications we enjoy today. With cell phones, computers, the internet and satellite communications, we have instant access to the globe and beyond. Business, entertainment, shopping and education are at our fingertips anytime, anywhere, any place.

Essay – To Get a Piece of Mail is Very Uplifting

I would like to start by saying thanks to the Prison Book Program. Thank you for sending resources to prisoners! I would like you to know how much this program and others like it are appreciated by people like myself. It is one of the best feelings you can get in prison. The feeling that someone cares.

Essay – Books of Joy

I am a 58 year old white male doing 20 flat years in a Louisiana prison. I came from a very dysfunctional home in Kentucky. I started out life more or less as a functional illiterate child with very little education. Somehow, I did manage to get a 8th grade education. It was years later that I realized that I need more education in order to survive in the “real world”. I learned that having a good education meant having a good job and a place in life itself.